Archive SXSW

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Hannibal Buress Played Drums At SXSW
Hannibal Buress Drums For Massachusetts Band at SXSW, Immediately Forgets Their Name on ‘Kimmel’
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Comedian Hannibal Buress may best be known to some as the comedian who ignited the Bill Cosby firestorm, but he’s also a hilarious standup and television star, lending his talent to two of the funniest, most progressive comedies on television, Broad City and The Eric Andre Show.

He appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live at the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin last night to discuss two things: first, that he’s been receiving death threats from Bill Cosby supporters, and second, that he managed to become a rockstar overnight. More

Music
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Boston hip hop makes noise at SXSW, continues to get louder
Music

For the second year in a row, SXSW was more to me than just a week of warm music and better people. It was that, sure. Anyone who works in the music industry in any capacity knows SXSW is essentially a vacation you take with all your favorite people in the world, where all your internet friends morph into real life characters, and where the tacos are abundant and the beer is free-flowing. More

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"Going Out In Style" by CreaturoS
CreaturoS returns with new music video, plays Boston tonight
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The four dudes that make up the local garage-rock outfit CreaturoS are no strangers to the Boston music circuit, having all played in a number of bands before joining forces for this one. Spawned out of the demise of the more psych-heavy band, Doomstar!, and a few other local acts, CreaturoS is an amalgamation of reverb-drenched riffs and heavy-hitting psychedelic explorations. They play fast. They play loud. And their tracks find strength in the jam-centric prowess of all (now four) guys playing together in the Boston music scene for quite some time now. More

Music
South By Southwest Fatal Crash
SXSW 2014: tragedy overshadows good music, and comes as little surprise
Music

Saturday evening around 4pm is always the bleakest: it’s when 6th Street takes on the air of a state fair that’s about to pack up for the season, where the sidewalks are littered with chewed-off and torn wristbands and the barrage of riffs from competing sound checks get to be too much. The adrenaline of South By Southwest has all but expired on that dirty stretch of Austin’s pavement at that point, and it’s like the bands that flooded those few square blocks, the ones that proved, once again, that this is the place where the best up-and-coming talent comes to try their luck with a new audience and succeed, are little more than a faint memory. More

BDCWire
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An unconventionally successful SXSW for ‘Local Losers’ Mean Creek
BDCWire

Most bands at South By Southwest have something to prove, blitzing through three twenty-minute sets a day, in between breakfast tacos, in order to get their music into the ears of a bunch of people who’d never heard of them before. Others park the band van somewhere south of the river, get plastered on Shiner Bock and try not to wind up in a headlock from the burly ex-biker bouncer at the Parish or Swan Dive so that they can watch their former touring buddies smash their guitars to pieces. More

Music
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The myth of SXSW continues to mislead, but it’s nothing to cry about
Music

If you read any pop culture website, have a Twitter account, or login to Facebook sometime this week, you are going to, in some way, experience South By Southwest.

You might experience some fun dispatches from musicians, complaints from fans, conjecture on whether the festival’s original appeal has been lost, straight up unfiltered hatred, or even catch wind of plans to invade the festival with an armed march (I knew I could count on you, Alex Jones). Trying to pin down South By Southwest as one simple thing is running a fool’s errand these days, and it’s hard to take a jaded musician’s pat dismissal of the fest’s cultural significance when this year includes panels with exclusive interviews (via Skype) with Edward Snowden and Julian Assange (whose current cultural/political significance far outweighs any band, and I mean ANY band, who are playing this year). SXSW is now a ballooning, unwieldly parade of technology, film, music, and overpriced pizza, and there’s not a single reason to be upset about that. Here’s why. More